Posts Tagged ‘Dear Friend’

7
Jun

The Climb of Lady Mary

   Posted by: crazyBobcat    in Daily

lady_mary_climbsMy dear friend, and consummate performer Dana, took on the role of adventuress at a recent sunny weekend at Scarborough Faire. I was fortunate enough to be out of my shoppe and managed to catch her scaling the tower near the front gate.

This girl is a treasure!

 

~KR (Written on 7 June 2011)

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27
Apr

Jenna & Cormac

   Posted by: crazyBobcat    in Daily

Jenna_Cormac On a cleaning day for Scarborough Faire, our dear friend Laura came out to assist (thank you!). She brought her young daughter with her, too, much to Cormac’s delight. Late in the day, they were just hanging out, like dear friends do, and I snapped this photo. I’ve softened it a bit for effect, but I love the photo.

Cheers.

~KR

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29
Mar

Peppers

   Posted by: crazyBobcat    in Daily

peppers I have a tradition.

Granted, it’s not a terribly old tradition, being only 3 years old this April. But, it’s a valued – and important – tradition to me.

Every Sunday – every Sunday – I have a Bloody Mary. This tradition started by chance, as the best ones often do, with the off-hand comment of a dear friend “hey, so I’ll see you tomorrow at my place for Bloody Mary’s around 11?”

Sure.

The tradition was born, and I’ll never look back.

This year, I’m on the lookout for a decent range of peppers so that I can infuse my own Vodka. I’m also considering a new mix recipe that I stumbled upon. In any case, the tradition continues and the Bloody Mary’s get better and better.

 

I love you, girls! All of you!

 

~KR

(Written on 29 March 2011)

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8
Mar

Don’t Shoot the Dog!

   Posted by: MB    in Daily

Don't Shoot the Dog!

2 March 2011

On my recent, wonderful trip to Sacramento, I was fortunate in learning many new things and meeting many fabulous new people. One of those folks was a dear friend of Kyrana’s, named Laurel, who is an educator, currently working on a graduate degree in counseling. She is a delightful woman I am now proud to know, and I enjoyed many a thought-provoking conversation with her throughout the week, on a number of different subjects.

One of the books she was reading (it turned out it was Kyrana’s copy of the book, so both of them are huge fans of it), and not for the first time, was this book entitled, Don’t Shoot the Dog! The New Art of Teaching and Training. Kyrana had learned to love the book when working as a wild animal handler and trainer.

Written by Karen Pryor, one of the trainers who put clicker training on the map, this is an amazingly intelligent, well-written study on behavior training and communication.  It is a scholarly work in that it references psychology and concepts that the author assumes her reader already understands.  But, it is still approachable and easy enough to read that it  makes the techniques she is teaching, accessible and attainable for just about any reader.

I was instantly attracted to the title, because I so strongly believe that there are really no bad dogs (or children, for that matter) just bad owners and parents.  I am an avid disciple of Cesar Millan, The Dog Whisperer, and I have even given some thought to a new career as a dog (and owner) trainer.  I believe that with the right communication, discipline, motivation and appreciation, dogs of all breeds can be loyal, well-behaved companions, and children can be prevented from running like wild animals through restaurants!  I could write reams just on that latter subject!  But, I digress.

I was well and truly hooked, once I realized that the concepts of clicker training and positive reinforcement were being taught to teachers and school counselors!  Finally!  the pendulum of discipline and control swings back toward sanity!

So, I began reading, and before the week was out, I had purchased my own copy and transferred my bookmark.

In this classic bestseller, Pryor outlines and explains, giving easily understood and useful examples, the various types of behavior modification methods and when each one is or isn’t appropriate.  She presents eight methods of ending undesirable behavior from furniture-clawing cats to sloppy roommates.  The ten laws of “shaping” behavior are listed and fully explained—methods of creating the behavior you want without ever raising a voice or a hand.  For me, the book casts the word “manipulation” in the benign, neutral light it deserves.  After all, the primary meaning of the word is “to manage skillfully and effectively”—something I know I strive to do.  It offers up interesting anecdotes not just about dog training, or children in classrooms, but about dolphins and elephants and cats and department managers.

And, there is the undeniable aspect of all this, that we train ourselves on a daily basis, too.  We train ourselves how to eat, exercise, sleep—how to spend our time.  We train ourselves how to deal with people.  And, in the words of another well-known psychologist, Dr. Phil—“we teach people how to treat us.”  Why not get a better handle on what we’re teaching?!

This book stands to benefit, not only dog owners and trainers … not only teachers and parents … but anyone who ever hopes to get other people (or themselves) to behave in a certain way—employees, co-workers, bosses, customers, contractors … restaurant servers and bartenders … the guys who pick up your trash — in short, it can benefit you.

I have read the whole thing, and will likely read it again.  I hope Kyle will read it.  I have recommended it to others, as well.  I can’t promise to remember everything I’ve learned, but I can promise I’ll know what book to reference when I come up against an interpersonal relationship that isn’t working, or a behavioral problem with my dogs.

So, take a look at Don’t Shoot the Dog! Even if you aren’t into “self-help books.” 😉

Opening sentence:  This book is about how to train anyone—human or animal, young or old, oneself or others—to do anything that can and should be done.

~MB

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4
Mar

Emerson

   Posted by: MB    in Daily

Emerson

25 February 2011

As a precursor to what I hope might be something I could eventually get good at, I’m offering up today, a book recommendation of sorts.   After a number of years when reading did not hold the priority in my life that it once did, and since I am a dyed in the wool bibliophile, unable to embrace the concept of getting rid of even a tenth of my book collection, I decided that reading needed to once again become a part of my every day world.  So, beginning in January 2011 (I guess you could call it a New Year’s resolution, although I hope that won’t jinx it!), I have indeed read with commitment almost every night before bed.  And, I am having a ball with it.  I’ve read a couple of things I’d been meaning to read for a long time, a couple of things I had never even heard of until recently, and a few things that have just sort of fallen into my hands, like this one.  And, since I am well on my way to reading more titles in a year than I’ve ever read before, I thought I should record the titles and make a few notes.   I won’t yet call what I’m doing a book revue … our dear friend Michael Klobe does amazing book reviews on his blog, and I merely aspire to do such justice to my reading.  It’s more like my own personal reading journal.

Emerson The Magnificent is a sweet little book with the ability to make you both laugh and cry.  And question. It is written  in few words, and somewhat crudely illustrated by Dwight Ritter, and can be easily read in a matter of minutes. I made the mistake of reading it on the plane on my way home from Florida recently, and I’m pretty sure the man sitting next to me had quite the chore in going out of his way to ignore my tears. A better setting for this reading would have been at home, alone, next to a box of tissues.

Written in the same, potentially life-changing style as Shel Silverstein’s The Giving Tree, Emerson is a tale of both hope and despair.  It is a story of faith for those who are reluctant to believe there is such a thing.  It is one man’s journey through life, making mistakes, with an absolutely unconditionally-loving friend.   As in The Giving Tree, the poignancy of the message comes in the tardiness of the learning … it is almost too late for the man in the book, but it is not too late for those who read his story.

Disclaimer: My mama gave me this book—it’s not overtly Christian, but it is a wonderfully spiritually-uplifting read.  It addresses the questions offered up by Augustine, centuries ago:  If there is no God, why is there so much good in the world?  If there is a God, why is there so much evil in the world?

“Taking a page” from Klobetime’s artful style (I hope he’ll let me know if he minds):  the opening sentence of the book reads:

Once, not long ago, there was a old man who lived by the sea in a ramshackle frame house with wooden shingles that were grayed and rotting like old teeth from chewing tobacco–no longer clean and sharp, but black and pitted.

~MB

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28
Feb

Happy Birthday, Captain

   Posted by: crazyBobcat    in Daily

red_light_district My dear friend, Curtis the Red, Captain of the Blazing Sun and Insurance salesman extraordinaire celebrated his 10th and a half birthday over the weekend. He was technically born on 29 February, so he celebrates it whenever he wants to with a big-to-do theme party.

This year, the theme was “Welcome to the Moulin Rouge” (everybody Can-Can!) with nearly everyone in attendance playing some part in the costume spectacle. As always, it was a lot of fun with good people and great company.

Happy Birthday, Curtis!

 

This photo is of the delightful Kayci in the Red Light District.

 

Cheers.

~KR (Written on 28 February 2011)

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9
Jan

Dinner

   Posted by: crazyBobcat    in Daily

7 January 2011

dinnerThe daughter of a dear friend  passed tragically, suddenly and completely unexpectedly after contracting an illness which progressed into an infection very quickly. The lapse of time between contracting the illness and passing away was approximately 10 hours. My heart goes out to her parents, who should never have to outlive their children, her husband and her two very young children.

 

Terrill & I met in a local bar and drank a couple of pints in her memory this evening. As a result, I missed dinner out with Stephen and my wife, so had to content myself with homemade nachos.

 

Cheers.

~KR (Written on 9 January)

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1
Jan

New Year’s Eve

   Posted by: MB    in Daily

ZHB on New Year's Eve

31 December 2010

New Year’s Eve isn’t the same for us as it was in the fifteen years of hosting one of the few Hogmanay parties in the United States.  It’s very low key by comparison.  But, we manage to make fun where ever we are and with whatever circumstances we’re given.  This year, we were fortunate enough to be invited to a private party where our dear friend Ron was playing in the band!  Ronnie has played the bass for longer than I’ve known him, but I had never before heard him play.  The phrase “it’s about time,” doesn’t even do the situation justice!  So, we pounced on the opportunity and we had a great time.  It turns out … he’s really good! <wink>

We listened to his band–the Zane Henley Band, and then we listened to the first set by the headlining band … also named after it’s lead singer, but obviously not sticking in my head.  We toasted the New Year, sang Old Lang Syne and crawled in bed by 1:30 p.m.  Welcome 2011.

~MB

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31
Jul

Seismo-Measurer Thing

   Posted by: crazyBobcat    in Daily

14 July 2010
So, it turns out that the yellow cord running the length of my street is attached to these little gizmos which are, according to a dear friend, a “seismo-measurer thingy”.
2010071355718 PM
A little more research indicates that the Chesapeake Power Company places these in areas surrounding a new frak site. I haven’t located the frak site yet, but it’s gotta be close. Damn natural gas.
Cheers.

~KR (Written on 31 July 2010)

Watching: Jennifer’s Body

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9
Jun

Dan as Will Kemp

   Posted by: MB    in Daily

Dan as Will Kemp

27 April 2010

I went shopping this morning! Glenda (Terrill’s Glenda, not David’s Glenda) needed new shoes for a formal party she’s attending this weekend, and she hates shopping for shoes. Imagine! I can’t! I love shopping for shoes and I need very little excuse to jump in and do so on someone else’s behalf. So, I met her at the mall, and performed the role of girlfriend and shoe expert rather well, if I do say so myself! She successfully found a perfect little pair of black dressy heels that will be just perfect with her little black dress. Of course, I didn’t exactly get out of the shoe department unscathed, but, what I bought was off the sale rack! 😉

We grabbed a quick lunch at Olive Garden and then the afternoon saw me zipping off to the mid-cities for my accupuncture appointment. I cannot rightly remember what happened after that, except that I know I have no photographic documentation of whatever it was! So, once again, I cheat with a weekend photo. Above is a photo of Dan … dear friend, SAPA director, and one of my repeat customers. This is his crazy, new outfit for faire this year. I documented my work on it here on the KRuMB as it progressed, and here is the finished product on the man. I would have taken his photo sooner, but he wanted me to wait ’til he had the new hat! 😉 My best disclaimer is this: Will Kemp was a “jester”-like character … a flamboyant actor … really …

~MB

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